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Author Topic: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?  (Read 5472 times)

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Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #200 on: October 05, 2020, 08:55:16 PM »
https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2020/10/05/mdhhs-issues-new-order-requiring-masks-restricting-gatherings-limiting-some-businesses-in-michigan/

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MDHHS issues new order requiring masks, restricting gatherings, limiting some businesses in Michigan

New order in effect now through Oct. 30, officials say

LANSING, Mich. – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has issued a new order restricting gathering sizes, requiring face coverings and limiting some businesses across the state, citing authority that wasn’t covered by the Supreme Court’s recent decision.

This order reinstates three aspects of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s previous emergency orders:

    Masks are required at indoor and outdoor gatherings that involve people from different households.
    Specific gathering limitations.
    Bars must close indoor common areas, and indoor gatherings are prohibited in most areas where alcohol is sold.

This order is effective immediately and remains in effect through Oct. 30, according to MDHHS officials.

Supreme Court ruling

On Friday, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that Whitmer did not have the authority to issue executive orders without the approval of the state legislature.

“It is important to note that this ruling does not take effect for at least 21 days, and until then, my emergency declaration and orders retain the force of law,” Whitmer said shortly after the ruling was announced. “Furthermore, after 21 days, many of the responsive measures I have put in place to control the spread of the virus will continue under alternative sources of authority that were not at issue in today’s ruling.”

But on Sunday, that timeline became less clear, as Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel revealed Whitmer’s orders would not be enforced, effective immediately. Nessel’s office encouraged Michiganders to continue following COVID-19 safety protocols, despite the court’s decision.

MDHHS Director Robert Gordon said this new order relies on authorities that were first enacted after the Spanish Flu of 1918, and that were not at issue in the Michigan Supreme Court’s decision.

“When it comes to fighting COVID-19, we are all in this together," Whitmer said. "We need Michiganders everywhere to do their part by wearing masks and practicing safe physical distancing so we can keep our schools and small businesses open and protect the brave men and women serving on the front lines of this crisis. The epidemic order that Director Gordon issued today is an important step to protect Michiganders across the state from the spread of COVID-19. Let’s all mask up and stay safe.”

According to officials, under MCL 333.2253, if the MDHHS director determines that control of an epidemic is necessary to protect the public health, the director by emergency order may prohibit the gathering of people for any purpose and may establish procedures to be followed during the epidemic to insure continuation of essential public health services and enforcement of health laws.

Violations of this order are punishable by a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than six months or a fine of not more than $200, or both. Violations of this order are also punishable by a civil fine of fine of up to $1,000.

“Michigan was hit hard by COVID-19 early in the pandemic,” Gordon said. “Strict preventive measures and the cooperation of Michiganders drove those numbers down dramatically, greatly reducing the loss of life. As we head into flu season, this order is necessary to protect vulnerable individuals, ensure the health care system can provide care for all health issues, keep schools open, and maintain economic recovery.”

Officials said local health departments can enforce the terms of the order.

Mask requirements

Michigan residents have to wear masks at indoor and outdoor gatherings. The order requires everyone to wear masks when people from multiple households are in a shared space in a group of two or more.

Businesses and government offices have to enforce those requirements for gatherings on their premises.

The order also requires children and staff members to wear masks at schools, except for in Michigan Economic Recovery Council Region 6.

Gathering size limitations

The order reinstates limitations on gathering sizes that mirror the requirements Whitmer previously put in place.

Indoor gatherings of more than 10 and up to 500 people occurring at a non-residential venue are permitted within certain limits.

Gatherings in venues with fixed seating must be limited to 20% of normal capacity. Gatherings of up to 25% of normal capacity are allowed in Michigan Economic Recovery Council Region 6.

In venues without fixed seating, attendance has to be limited to 20 people per 1,000 square feet in each occupied room. Gatherings of up to 25 people per 1,000 square feet are allowed in Michigan Economic Recovery Council Region 6.

Non-residential outdoor gatherings of between 100 and 1,000 people are allowed at venues with fixed seating at up to 30% of normal capacity and at 30 people per 1,000 square feet at venues without fixed seating.

Business limitations

The order doesn’t close bars, but it requires them to close indoor common areas where people can congregate, dance or otherwise mingle.

Indoor gatherings are prohibited anywhere alcoholic beverages are sold, except for table services where parties are separated from one another by at least six feet.

In addition, athletes training, practicing or competing in an organized sport have to wear facial coverings, except when swimming or consistently maintaining six feet of distance.

This will piss off everyone celebrating the other news of the court shutting down Whitmers EO's.
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #201 on: October 12, 2020, 12:51:21 AM »
https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/michigan/2020/10/11/michigan-again-at-high-risk-for-virus-outbreak-amid-worry-of-2nd-wave-data-shows/

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Michigan again at 'high risk’ for virus outbreak amid worry of 2nd wave, data shows

Michigan sees largest COVID-19 case spike since April

A research group has once again labeled Michigan at "high risk” for a coronavirus outbreak as COVID-19 cases begin to rise rapidly across the state.

The group of technologists, epidemiologists, health experts and public policy leaders at Covid Act Now are identifying each state’s risk level for the spread of COVID-19 -- which have recently worsened in most parts of the U.S.

On Thursday, Michigan’s risk level for a coronavirus outbreak increased from “medium risk” to “high risk” for the first time since July 31. The state’s new risk level is largely due to an increased infection rate and rapid increase of daily new COVID-19 cases, according to the data.

Michigan was previously labeled as experiencing “controlled disease growth."

Like most other states, Michigan’s risk for coronavirus spread has constantly shifted due to fluctuating rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization, contact tracing and more over the last several months.

On July 31, we reported that Michigan’s status had changed from being “at risk of an outbreak” to experiencing “slow disease growth.” The state initially moved to a higher risk level on July 8 as COVID-19 case numbers increased and contact tracing decreased across Michigan.

The state has since maintained its medium risk level -- until Oct. 8, when it again shifted in an undesirable direction.
Infection rate

As of Sunday, data shows that Michigan currently has an infection rate of 1.12 -- meaning each person infected with COVID-19 is infecting 1.12 other people. The state’s infection rate had improved throughout August after increasing in July, but began to increase again throughout September.

Michigan had an infection rate of 0.99 on August 26, 1.06 on July 31, 1.21 on July 19 and 1.14 on July 8.

Covid Act Now considers an infection rate “critical” if it surpasses 1.4. Michigan’s current infection rate of 1.12 is considered “high," and is contributing to the state’s worsened risk status for virus spread.
Daily new cases

Another factor contributing to Michigan’s high risk status is the number of new COVID-19 cases recorded each day per every 100,000 people.

On Sunday, Covid Act Now reports that Michigan is recording 11.7 new COVID-19 cases each day per every 100,000 residents -- a number that the research group considers “high.”

Any number higher than 1 is considered “medium” and anything above 10 is considered “high." A state has reached “critical” standing if it reports more than 25 daily new cases per every 100,000 residents, according to the group.

On August 26, Michigan was reporting a medium rate of 7.1 new confirmed COVID-19 cases per day for every 100,000 residents -- an improvement from 7.3 on July 31. According to the data, Michigan’s rate of daily new cases peaked at 16.1 on April 7.

The group’s data aligns with coronavirus case and death data reported by the state of Michigan.

Michigan is currently experiencing its largest spike in COVID-19 cases since the beginning of the pandemic. On Saturday, the state reported a total of 134,656 confirmed virus cases, recording an increase of 1,522 new cases since Friday -- the highest single-day increase since April 7.

As of Saturday, the state’s 7-day moving average of new cases reached 1,020. This is the first time Michigan has recorded a 7-day moving average above 1,000 since April 17.

Contact tracing

Contact tracing in Michigan has been steadily decreasing since June and has reached its lowest point ever since the beginning of the pandemic.

Contact tracing is cited by experts as a key factor in containing COVID-19, but Michigan’s percentage of contact tracing has considerably decreased in recent months as virus cases continue to increase across the state.

As of Sunday, Covid Act Now reports that Michigan is contact tracing 18 percent of new COVID-19 cases within 48 hours of infection -- which health officials say is insufficient to contain the virus. Experts recommend that at least 90 percent of new COVID-19 cases are traced within 48 hours to contain the virus.

“With 1,167 new daily cases on average, Michigan needs an estimated 5,835 contact tracers on staff to trace each new case to a known case within 48 hours of detection. Per our best available data, Michigan has 1,050 contact tracers, fulfilling 18% of this staffing requirement,” the report reads. “With insufficient contact tracing staff, Michigan is unlikely to be able to successfully identify and isolate sources of disease spread fast enough to prevent new outbreaks.”

When a state’s contact tracing falls below 20 percent it is considered “low,” and when it falls below 7 percent it is considered “critical,” according to the research. Between 10 and 90 percent is considered “medium.”

COVID-19 testing

Covid Act Now’s research shows that Michigan needs to expand COVID-19 testing to better contain the virus.

As of Sunday, Michigan has a “medium” positive test rate of 3.3 percent, according to the data. The group says this number indicates that the state is not conducting testing as aggressively and widespread as it should be to identify new cases and better contain the virus.

The state previously had a “low” positive test rate of 2.3 percent on August 26 -- a slight increase from 2.2 percent on July 31, but still a decrease from 2.7 percent reported on July 19.

Michigan’s positive COVID-19 test rate had been gradually climbing after dropping dramatically during May and the beginning of June. The state saw its lowest positive test rate -- 0.9 percent -- on June 10. Since then the positive test rate climbed up to 2.8 percent in July and has fluctuated between 2 and 3 percent throughout August and September.

Covid Act Now considers a test rate to be “medium” instead of low if it surpasses 3 percent. Between 10-19 percent is considered “high,” and between 20-100 percent is considered “critical.”
Virus hospitalizations

On a more positive note, Michigan has seen improvements in COVID-19 hospitalizations since May. Until recently, virus hospitalizations have steadily decreased since May 13.

According to the research group, of the available ICU beds in Michigan, only about 16 percent are currently in use by COVID-19 patients, suggesting that there is “likely enough capacity to absorb a wave of new COVID infections,” the report reads.

Covid Act Now says Michigan hospitals can “likely handle a new wave of COVID” -- which is good news, considering experts worry that the U.S. may be at the beginning of a second wave of virus infections.
COVID-19 by Michigan county

Covid Act Now does also break data down at the county level, assigning a coronavirus risk level for every county in the state. A majority of Michigan counties are considered at a “medium” risk for a COVID-19 outbreak, according to the data.
A map of Michigan counties and their assigned COVID-19 risk levels from research led by Covid Act Now. Risk levels have now been assigned to all Michigan counties by the group. Photo courtesy of Covid Act Now's website.

In our last report on August 26, most Michigan counties were labeled at medium risk for coronavirus spread by Covid Act Now, with very few counties labeled at high risk or experiencing an active outbreak.

As of Sunday, a number of counties have shifted to high risk or are experiencing an active or imminent coronavirus outbreak -- especially in the upper peninsula and throughout the southwestern half of the lower peninsula.

Luce, Houghton, Delta, Iron, Keweenaw, Menominee, Mackinac, Dickinson and Alger counties in the U.P. are currently labeled as experiencing an active or imminent outbreak. Only Oscoda and Calhoun counties in the lower peninsula share this same label.

About half of the counties in the lower peninsula are experiencing controlled disease growth (yellow), while the other half are considered at risk for an outbreak (orange). Wayne and Oakland counties -- two of the hardest-hit by the pandemic -- are notably experiencing controlled disease growth, largely due to lower infection rates.

Only Alpena County is considered “on track to contain COVID,” according to the research group.

    Even more detailed COVID-19 county data has been broken down for all U.S. counties by Covid Act Now in collaboration with the Harvard Global Health Institute and dozens more researchers and public health officials. Click here to take a look.

Pandemic worsens across US

Coronavirus spread is worsening throughout the U.S. with most states labeled at high risk for an outbreak, alongside Michigan.

In total, 31 states are labeled at high risk for a COVID-19 outbreak and 13 states are considered to be experiencing an active or imminent outbreak. Only six states are considered at medium risk for a coronavirus outbreak, according to the data.

No states are considered to be on track to contain the virus.

In our last report on August 26, most states were labeled at medium risk for a coronavirus outbreak, and more states were considered at low risk than they are now.

Six states -- including Ohio -- also had a record breaking single-day increase in COVID-19 cases on Saturday, leading to new fears that the country may be at the cusp of a second wave.

“We’re quite fearful for what we are heading into and what we’re starting to see in our hospitals,” said Dr. Megan Ranney with Brown University. “We are all deeply afraid that this is the beginning of that dreaded second wave.”

Europe is currently experiencing a second wave of COVID-19.

Ranney said doctors all over the country are starting to see more severe cases. The warning of a second wave comes a day after health officials reported the highest number of new COVID-19 cases in nearly two months.

“We did see those spikes in numbers that were largely young people going back to college,” Ranney said. “But what we’re seeing now is that it’s starting to spread within the community.”

An updated coronavirus projection model claims the U.S. could see 395,000 deaths by February, a different number from what President Trump is projecting.

Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

betterdan

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #202 on: October 13, 2020, 06:42:21 AM »
You mentioned a little while back about sodas being hard to find and limited on the amounts you can buy. Well it started happening here a couple of weeks ago. I saw this article explaining why

https://www.wavy.com/news/business/cant-find-your-favorite-soda-at-the-store-heres-why/?fbclid=IwAR1z7311rkFATKJoI5PhrVcrxCzyeThbIHWa0iYwldXe1PrF3jVnxvsY7g4

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #203 on: October 13, 2020, 06:42:53 PM »
I've thought about buying a massive amount of it during the next sale because we aren't being limited again just yet as a just in case but I'm also running out of room for the empty cans because returns are limited still. I'm almost at the point of just tossing them because I can't keep piling bags of them in my shed to get them out of the house. I probably have $50.00 worth of cans in my shed right now just waiting to be returned.
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

betterdan

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #204 on: October 13, 2020, 09:16:29 PM »
Aha so you are the reason for the can shortage!

We just toss them in the garbage, no deposit required for them. I would put them in the recycle bin but we don't get anything for it, I'm sure the city does though but I'll be damned if they ever lowered our trash pickup charges for recycling so screw it.

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #205 on: October 14, 2020, 03:23:30 AM »
Yep, $0.10 per can or bottle here. We could toss them but then you're throwing away $1.20 for every 12-pack you buy. At this point we really should just ditch the deposit since the stores don't want to deal with the constant sanitizing of the machines and now that MI has all but ditched anything safety related for Covid I don't want to risk spending 30+ minutes in a small room with 5 other people constantly coughing to return them.
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #206 on: October 15, 2020, 04:23:52 PM »
https://www.michigan.gov/som/0,4669,7-192-47796-542379--,00.html

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State of Michigan and MSU Launch COVID-19 App Pilot for Campus and the Surrounding Community

Anonymous app alerts users to possible coronavirus exposure to slow spread

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 15, 2020
Contact: Bob Wheaton, 517-241-2112

LANSING, MICH. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget (DTMB) and Michigan State University (MSU) today launched a COVID-19 exposure notification app pilot program on MSU’s campus and for the surrounding community. The app is a next step to help reduce the spread of the virus following increased testing and additional contact tracing efforts in Michigan.

MI COVID Alert is a voluntary, anonymous exposure notification smartphone app available at no cost. By submitting a non-identifying code provided by the public health department, app users with COVID-19 can confidentially alert students, faculty and staff, and others who may have also been exposed to the virus.
“MSU has an opportunity to lead the way for all of Michigan in using this easy-to-use app to avoid a second wave,” said Robert Gordon, MDHHS director. “While masking and social distancing remain as critical as ever, MI COVID Alert is another way to help the MSU and Ingham County community contain COVID while leading their lives.”

MSU students, faculty and staff as well as members of the local community are encouraged to download and use MI COVID Alert as part of exposure notifications in the latest iOS or Android update.

“Preventing the spread of the virus is of utmost importance, and early detection efforts are essential in our overall approach to battling the virus,” said Michigan State University President Samuel Stanley Jr., M.D. “By downloading the app, Spartans are sending a clear message that we are committed to being part of the solution.”

When a person tests positive for COVID-19, they receive a pin from the local health department or State of Michigan case investigators that allows them to share their test results anonymously on the app. MI COVID Alert uses low energy Bluetooth technology to detect nearby phones that also have the app. Michigan worked with Apple and Google to make MI COVID Alert compatible with similar apps in other states. If a MI COVID Alert user has been in close contact with someone who submitted a positive COVID-19 test result, a push notification will be sent to their phone once the positive test result is entered into the system. A notification means the app user was possibly within six feet for at least 15 minutes of someone who tested positive and shared their result. The app works in conjunction with traditional contact tracing, mask-wearing, hand washing and social distancing, but is not a replacement for these precautions or participation in contact tracing. It is another, possibly faster way to know about possible exposure to COVID-19.

Whether someone experiences symptoms or remains asymptomatic, anyone exposed to COVID-19 should consider getting tested and quarantining and should watch for symptoms for 14 days from the date of possible exposure. On-campus testing centers are available for students, faculty and staff. Information is available on MSU’s COVID-19 testing page. Individuals in need of testing may also contact the Michigan COVID-19 hotline by calling 888-535-6136 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, or dialing 211 on their mobile phone to locate and schedule an appointment at a nearby, off-campus testing location.

The exposure notification feature included in recent iOS and Android operating system updates only works with a companion app like MI COVID Alert. The app is available in the Apple and Google app stores.

The State of Michigan will evaluate expansion of the app statewide based on results of the pilot program.

Other states, including Virginia, Arizona, New York, Alabama and New Jersey, recently launched similar exposure notifications apps statewide. Additional states have apps in development.

Information around this outbreak is changing rapidly. The latest information is available at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus and CDC.gov/Coronavirus.
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

betterdan

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #207 on: October 16, 2020, 04:00:23 AM »
Michigan is late to the party. Virginia already has an app like that called CovidWise or something.

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #208 on: October 16, 2020, 05:36:24 AM »
Shh, someone might blame the Democrats here for that...  ;)
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.

Chris

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Re: Is the Coronavirus in your area yet?
« Reply #209 on: October 25, 2020, 05:39:56 AM »
https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2020/10/24/michigan-sets-new-record-daily-covid-19-cases/6021324002/

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Michigan sets new record for daily COVID-19 cases

Michigan added 3,338 new COVID-19 cases and 35 more deaths Saturday, setting a new record for daily cases.

The additions bring the state's total number of cases to 158,026 and total deaths to 7,182.

Michigan's numbers are even higher with probable cases. The state now has 175,612 probable and confirmed cases and 7,522 confirmed and probable deaths, according to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Saturday's additions surpassed the single-day record of 2,030 set on Oct. 15.

After the numbers were announced, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer urged Michiganders to "do the right thing" in a tweet.

Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, Michigan's chief medical executive and chief deputy for health, said in a statement Saturday, "If rates continue like this, we risk overwhelming our hospitals and having many more Michiganders die.”

“The data shows we are continuing to see alarming increases in the incidence of COVID-19 infections in Michigan," Khaldun said. “It is now more important than ever that people take this seriously. Wear a mask every time you are going to be around someone outside of your own household. Avoid large gatherings and maintain a safe distance from others.

The state said while the data represents the information from reporting labs, it does represent more current trends in disease occurrence. More than 96% of test results reported Saturday originated from tests in the past five days, the department said.

"As information is collected by Michigan’s public health community that better describes cases, we are continuing to see clusters of illness associated with facilities, programs and schools. These cases, along with a large number of community-acquired cases, have been contributing to the elevation in reports of confirmed COVID-19 infection," Khaldun said.

Last week saw the state's biggest surge of positive cases during the pandemic when Michigan had 10,241 confirmed cases of the virus. The previous weekly high was 9,768 set April 5 through April 11.

While testing for the virus has increased greatly, Michigan is also seeing upticks in hospitalizations and deaths linked to the virus.

As of Friday, the state reported 1,047 adults hospitalized with confirmed cases of the virus, which is three times the number a month earlier.

Over the first six days of this week, Michigan reported 172 new deaths, it's the most deaths reported in a week since May 31-June 6, when there were 188 deaths.

At the height of the pandemic, 966 deaths were reported during the week of April 19-25.

"We are now at our peak when it comes to daily new cases," Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said during her Wednesday COVID-19 response update. "This peak is higher than what we saw in April."

Whitmer added that cases spiked in the first week of October after the Michigan Supreme Court issued their ruling that the governor violated her constitutional authority by continuing to issue orders to combat COVID-19 without the approval of state lawmakers.

Local health departments are investigating 393 outbreaks, compared to 123 from earlier in the month.

In the last 30 days, there have been nearly 30,000 positive cases in Michigan, said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, the state's Chief Medical Executive. With the state's contract tracing system, officials were able to identify 35,000 more symptomatic individuals who were in contact.

"Top categories for outbreaks remain long-term care facilities, educational settings and social gatherings," Khaldun said Wednesday. "We're also seeing many tied to religious gatherings. We now know of 18 new and ongoing outbreaks that local health departments are investigating."

More than 53,300 tests were completed in Michigan Friday, and of the tests, 50,000 returned negative, giving Michigan a 5.4% positivity rating.

Long term healthcare facilities continue to face consistent hurdles. As of Tuesday, 9,185 residents have confirmed cases, 2,222 resident deaths. While deaths have slowed over the past two months, there has been an uptick of staff members infected: 5,424 compared to 4,100 in August.

The Michigan health department on Wednesday issued an order allowing indoor visitation by appointment at long-term care facilities if a facility has had no new cases within 14 days and if COVID-19 prevalence in a county in which a facility is located falls within permissible boundaries.

Under state guidelines, more than 30 counties would still be barred from indoor visitations because of their ranking on the MI Safe Start Map. They include Washtenaw and Kent counties, some mid-Michigan counties and most of the counties in the Upper Peninsula. Visits would be allowed in Metro Detroit but would be required to be tested for COVID-19 beforehand under the new state rules.

Whitmer reminded Michigan masks are required statewide outside of residential areas.

"Our numbers are climbing. We need to double down on wearing masks and maintain social distancing," Whitmer said, adding there won't be an available vaccine in several months. "... We know that more people will get sick, hospitalized and sadly, more people will lose their battle with COVID-19."

As of Saturday, 109,539 people were considered "recovered."

Michigan's schools have recorded 28 new outbreaks as of Monday. Of the outbreaks, 25 were at K-12 schools. See an updated list of school outbreaks online.

I can't wait to see what happens in the next month with this "fake" virus from Chynah. obfrank I know people who were ecstatic over the courts ruling here and then called for Whitmer to be murdered because that's just how they are these days. It's all just sad.
Missing: 1 signature. Last seen running away screaming after seeing a pair of 34D's turning into 32A's after a bra removal. If you see this signature please contact the nearest law enforcement agency immediately as it has been traumatized immensely and can be quite unstable due to this. Please do not approach this signature unarmed because it is unknown as to how it will react. To prevent this issue from happening in the future please stop wearing overly padded bras.